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Everything About Service Integration And Management (SIAM) - Part 1 of 4

Sept. 13, 2022

Everything About Service Integration And Management (SIAM) - Part 1 of 4

Special Interview With Claire Agutter (@ClaireAgutter)

Claire Agutter is Director at Scopism & ITSM Zone, having over two decades of rich experience in ITSM.

She put forth compelling reasons and the business impact of implementing the SIAM way. What is SIAM? What are its benefits? How Can We Build A Culture Of Responsibility & Accountability?


Special Interview With Claire Agutter (@ClaireAgutter)

Everything About Service Integration And Management (SIAM) - Part 1 of 4

"And these problems just bounce around because nobody actually wants to take ownership of something that's difficult. Whereas if you switch to working in the SIAM way, you have that service integrator responsible for pulling people together and saying, look, this isn't about blame. It's not about penalties. It's about the fact that the customer isn't getting what they need and how do we collectively address that?" - Says Claire Agutter, one of the 50 Most Influential Women in Tech, 25 Top HDI Thought Leaders and our esteemed guest on the AITSM show.

Claire Agutter is Director at Scopism & ITSM Zone, having over two decades of rich experience in ITSM.

She put forth compelling reasons and the business impact of implementing the SIAM way. What is SIAM? What are its benefits? How Can We Build a Culture of Responsibility & Accountability?

We'd learn a lot from her plenty of examples, values, principles, and point-by-point discussion from 20+ years of rich experience.

Don't miss the end of part 1 (this), where she ties everything back to culture and business value perspective.

In the next part, we will deep dive into the SIAM model, i.e., layers, roles (especially service integrators), dynamics, big bang or phased approach, integration and automation.

"And sometimes what you see is actually we're managing the external suppliers nicely because we've got contracts and targets. And then you've got these internal teams who are a kind of just doing whatever they want because there are no contracts are no target. So, what we're doing is looking holistically across the service and managing everybody who's involved. So maybe a slightly different style with the internal teams. It's perhaps more about, the persuasion and building some informal agreements."

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Transcript

Anand Tambey: Welcome back to AITSM Show. Today we'll be talking about an exciting topic Service Integration and Management. We are so proud to have Claire Agutter with us, an eminent woman thought leader. She's one of the 50 most influential woman in tech and one of the HDI top 25 thought leaders for multiple years.

Claire, welcome to the AITSM show. Please let us introduce about your journey about your story.

Claire Agutter: Thanks so much for the invitation. It's, it's a real pleasure to be here. So as you said I work in the, the service integration and management space. SIAM, but actually my whole career's been in service management. So, 20 plus years now, which is , which is quite a long time. So I've, I've done most service management roles.

In that time, I started on the service desk, like, like a lot of people do moved into change analyst and change manager roles that was back in the days of ITIL version 2. I did some implementation and consultancy roles, and then I moved into training at the same time as ITIL version three was, was getting started.

So. Doing classroom training at the time, but then founded my first business, which was ITSM zone. And that was focused on eLearning for service management. So at the time there wasn't really a lot of options in the, the eLearning space for service management. It was something quite new. So. So that business grew, grew rapidly.

And then six years ago founded Scopism, which is my second business. And Scopism had multiple strands. We had the virtual consultancy practices. We were looking at events, but the main thing was, was content. And the kind of the vision behind Scopism was to share content that would help service management professionals because I've seen and I'm, I'm sure you and your audience have seen the world has got so much more complicated. You know, back when I first started, there was just ITIL. There was nothing else. Maybe, you know, PRINCE two was, was around as well.

There's ITIL, you know, there's DevOps, SIAM, BRM, COBIT there's just so much to be aware of. So Scopism we thought, you know, How can we help service management professionals? And one of the things that we did was, was work with the community to, to write the Siam body of knowledge. And that then has just, you know, really kicked off this, this whole journey in the Siam space.

So around events around publications. Working with Exin to launch a global training and certification scheme. So it's, it's just been brilliant and, and working with the Siam community is, is such a fantastic opportunity.

Anand Tambey: Right? Right. Our community would like to know first about SIAM, service, integration, and management, and then probably we'll move towards other topics there. So what is SIAM actually?

Claire Agutter: How long have we got? I'll try and keep it brief. And, and there is, there is a lot of good information on the Scopism website as well, which is, is all available for free. So anybody who's interested can, can go read there as well, but really Siam started to develop in the UK government.

And we're, we're talking about going back kind of 10, 15 years. And really the driver was that there were these huge government, IT projects with lots of big companies involved and this feeling really that value wasn't particularly being delivered either. Did you had government departments with kind of these monolithic contracts with one organization.

So you got value in some places, but not in others. Are you were working with multiple big suppliers, but they weren't necessarily working in a joined up way. So. The roots of SIAM was this kind of, how do we get past this problem of working with multiple service providers as part of the, the development and delivery of an IT service.

And this, this concept of service integration was born, which is, you know, let's build a capability. That is focused on end to end management, holistic management across all of our different service providers. And what that will then allow us to do is encourage our suppliers to collaborate, communicate, you know, not just to be focused on their targets, their contract.

It's much more about how do we work together to deliver value to our customer because that's good for the customer. It's good for the suppliers and the service providers as well, because they then have that, that confidence that the demand will be there in future that the confidence to invest. So that, that was kind of the roots of it.

But then. Again, you know, I'm sure most of your audience will be familiar with this, this concept now that we're all using external people to deliver either all our paths of our IT services and that, you know, that could be anything from the, the giants like AWS and Microsoft through to sort of tiny really niche software companies.

But if they don't all knit together, if they don't all work together, We, we get stuck. And, and the, really the really sort of basic example, the simple way to illustrate this is, you know, something goes wrong with one of your IT services. And the ticket goes to the application team and the application team say, oh no, it's definitely not the application.

It must be a database. And it goes to the database team and they say, no, no, not us. I wonder if it's to security and that patch they've just done. No, it's not security. And these, these problems just bounce around because nobody actually wants to take ownership of, of something that's difficult. Whereas if you switch to working in, in the, the Siam way, you have that service integrator, who's responsible for pulling all of these people together and saying, look, you know, this isn't about blame. It's not about penalties. It's about the fact that the customer isn't getting what they need and how do we collectively address that? And if you can, you know, if you can build collaboration at that level that opens up the door for, you know, future in innovation, really having all of your supply chain working together.

So. It's it's a hugely powerful thing. And, and what we see at Scopism is it it's growing you know, interests growing is growing around the world because everybody recognizes these problems.

Anand Tambey: True. True, actually it is even more complex too, right? If we see usual ITSM scenario in one organization itself, right, there are issues like going to hand off to teams and multiple teams involved, multiple security team, incident teams, and all problem management teams are involved.

But here, I guess the complexity increases maybe threefold or tenfold, maybe so.

Claire Agutter: It does, but how, yeah, I was just gonna say, that's such a good point that you raise, because I tend to talk about the external service providers because that that's kind of the. The the big issue sometimes, but you do have these internal teams as well.

And sometimes what you see is actually we're managing the external suppliers quite nicely because we've got contracts and targets. And then you've got these internal teams who are kind of just doing whatever they want because there are no contracts are no target. Nothing happens if, if something goes wrong and actually those teams get moved into the SIAM model in just the same way as an external service provider does. So what we're doing is looking holistically across the service and managing everybody who's involved. So maybe a slightly different style with the internal teams. It's, it's perhaps more about, you know, the persuasion and building some informal agreements.

But absolutely bringing those in and, and it's, it's something that maybe doesn't happen in a lot of organizations and that there is this distinction between internal and external. So, so it's a really good point that you raise there.

Anand Tambey: True. True. True. So the internal teams and external teams, it should be treated as same actually, right?

Yes. Because we are working for a customer. Yes. So for customer, we are the one team be in any organization or any supplier or in any vendor. Right. So, I have like a big question here? Like how do we actually ensure the accountability and responsibilities in such an environment?

Claire Agutter: A challenge. And it's a challenge at all levels, because for example, at the moment, in a lot of organizations, you've got this direct relationship between the customer and each of the individual suppliers. And what we're doing in a SIAM model is bringing in the service integrator to act as the agent of the customer organization.

So they need to be empowered. And equally the customer needs to step back, which isn't always an easy thing to do or a comfortable thing to do if they've been used to having that direct relationship. So it, it depends on the environment that you are bringing Siam in. You know, if it's, if it's a Greenfield environment, These things are more simple because you know, the customer will be either creating their own internal service integrator function or working with an organization that will provide the service integrator for them, and then choosing the suppliers.

So the roles and responsibilities can be the. You know, nailed pretty much from day one, but most of us are not coming into a Greenfield situation. We've got existing contracts, some of them might, you know, run for longer. And what we're trying to do is, is bring a service integrator into that. And, and in that instance, so much of it comes down to I guess people skills and people management and organizational change management. So once the service integrator is in place, it's, it's building the regular communication, the meetings it's reinforcing new ways of working and just continuing with that. And, and it can, you know, it can be really difficult.

I, I think. We, we do the global SIAM survey every year. And we ask one of the questions that we ask is, you know, how long do organizations take or think it'll take to introduce a SIAM model. And we are talking years, you know, multiple years to, to have this done perfectly. And, and during those years, you know, the goalpost move as well because some contract will be terminated.

New service providers will come in. So it's, it's not something that can be done overnight. But I guess as with any organizational change, it's in the planning and it's in the consistency and just continually kind of reinforcing these new behaviors.

Anand Tambey: Right. So that's a good point here about the culture or maybe here, the main evangelist service integrator there itself. So, so what are the roles involved there in SIAM?

<Continued in the next part 2 of 4>

Claire Agutter Profile Photo

Claire Agutter

Director at Scopism & ITSM Zone

I am a service management trainer, consultant and author. In 2017, 18 and 19 I was recognised as an HDI Top 25 Thought Leader and nominated as one of Computer Weekly's top 50 Women in Tech. I host the popular ITSM Crowd hangouts, and I'm the Chief Architect for VeriSM.

At ITSM Zone, our mission is to provide amazing eLearning to help you build the skills for your digital transformation, including ITIL, DevOps, BRM, SIAM, VeriSM and more. At Scopism, we support you with high quality content including the SIAM Foundation and Professional BoKs.